How to

choose a sleeping bag

A good sleeping bag is an essential part of any overnight outdoor adventure. From fill, shape, liners, seams and zipper style, we’ll help you understand what sleeping bag will work best for you and give you info on features that will help you rest easy.

How to

choose a sleeping bag

A good sleeping bag is an essential part of any overnight outdoor adventure. From fill, shape, liners, seams and zipper style, we’ll help you understand what sleeping bag will work best for you and give you info on features that will help you rest easy.

Use

When and where will you be using your sleeping bag?

Depending on the frequency, location and the season that you plan to use your sleeping bag, there are many options. 

Temperature

Mild: 6° C (42° F) or warmer

Suitable for summer camping, RV and indoor use.

Cool: 0° to 5° C (32° to 41° F)

Suitable for spring and summer camping, backpacking, RV and indoor use.

Cold: -1° to -5° C (23° to 31° F)

Suitable for spring, fall and winter camping.

Very Cold -6° C (22° F) or colder

Suitable for fall and winter camping. 

For extreme cold weather sleeping bags, please consult a sales associate.

Sleeping Bags

Rectangular Sleeping Bags

Rectangular sleeping bags are ideal for general family camping and are the most versatile. The rectangular shape is roomy and comfortable. These bags can be used as a blanket or duvet when unzipped and can generally be zipped together with another bag that has a compatible zipper.
See Rectangular Sleeping Bags

Mummy Sleeping Bags

Mummy sleeping bags are warmer and lighter than rectangular and barrel or hybrid bags, and usually include a hood. This sleeping bag is meant to fit snug to the body and to move less with the user. They are ideal for serious campers who might face extreme weather conditions. They are also usually more compressible and take up less space than other bags.

See Mummy Sleeping Bags

Barrel or Hybrid Sleeping Bags

Barrel or hybrid sleeping bags are narrow at the feet and wider in the middle. These bags provide the warmth of a mummy bag with the roominess of a rectangular bag.

See Barrel/Hybrid Sleeping Bags

Lingo

Outer Cover Material

The majority of sleeping bags are made with a polyester outer shell. Some bags use heavy cotton, which is durable, but adds bulk and weight. 

Inner Liner Material

Lower–priced bags generally use a polyester lining similar to the polyester outer shell. These are lighter weight and cooler on the skin. Some bags use cotton flannel, which is durable, warm and comfortable.

Full–Length Draft Tube

More premium, colder rated bags may have a draft tube that protects the user from drafts through the zipper. The insulated flap runs the entire length of the zipper.

Quilted Construction

By sewing the inner lining and outer shell together; the fill is secured, preventing it from shifting. The disadvantage of this stitching is that there is no fill along the stitched-through line resulting in cold spots. 

Offset–Quilted Construction

Used on more premium bags, this method provides the benefits of quilting but uses a double layer of insulation with each layer being stitched to the outer using offset stitch-lines. This means no cold spots!

Zippered Vents

Some bags will have zippered vents along the side or near the foot box to allow you to regulate temperature and allow air circulation. 

Hood & Neck Yoke

A lot of your body heat is lost through your head and neck. Having a hood that covers the back of your head as well as a neck yoke that covers your shoulders and neck will greatly reduce heat loss and help you stay warm. 

Sleeping Bag Liners

Liners are a great addition to any sleeping bag, because they not only add extra warmth, but also help to keep your bag clean and free from body oils and dirt. Make sure to buy one that matches the shape of your bag.

Zipper Cover

Zipper covers are a piece of fabric that covers the zipper when you close the bag and helps to ensure the bag doesn’t unzip while you sleep.

Two Way Zipper

Two way zippers can run the full length of the bag and offer the choice of extra ventilation.

Inner & Exterior Pockets

These pockets are great for keeping valuable items, such as your phone or wallet, close by.

Stuff & Compression Sacks

Stuff sacks are generally larger and are used for sleeping bags where the packed size doesn’t pose a problem, such as family camping. Compressions sacks are meant to be compact and are great for backpacking and hiking, ensuring your sleeping bag takes up as little room as possible.

Use

Temperature

Sleeping Bags

Lingo